www.vetjg.com
Ce nt ro   Ve te ri na ri o   JG
cuidando a su mejor amigo desde 1989
Avenida de Alicante, 18 (Edificio JG)
03110-Mutxamel (Alicante)
Tfno: 96 5951897 (24 horas)
contactar

¿que hora es?

medicina preventiva
urgencias 24 horas
servicio a domicilio
hospitalización
gestión de núcleos zoológicos
cuidados intensivos
rehabilitación
radiología digital
laboratorio
endoscopia
ecografía
ecocardiografía
e.c.g.
resonancia magnética
cirugía
dermatología
neurología
endocrinología
cardiología
etología
oftalmología
hematología
oncología
odontología
traumatología
otorrino
obstetricia
urología
aves
reptiles
pequeños mamíferos
primates
otras mascotas

MEDICINA AVIAR. PARTE XVII. ENFERMEDAD DE NEWCASTLE

Por Juan M. Griñán. Veterinario JG especialista en medicina aviar

LA ENFERMEDAD DE NEWCASTLE
Paramyxoviridae
The Paramyxoviridae family consists of two subfamilies: 325a Paramyxovirinae with the genera Paramyxovirus and Morbillivirus (mammalian only); and Pneumovirinae with the mammalian respiratory syncytial viruses and turkey rhinotracheitis virus. Members of this family have nonsegmented single-stranded RNA of negative polarity and an enveloped, helical, capsid symmetry. Virions are generally pleomorphic, rounded and 100 to 500 nm in diameter. A filamentous form 100 nm wide and variable in length has been described but may be an artifact. The virion surface is covered with 8 nm projections (so-called “herring bone”) nucleocapsids that may be released from disrupted particles. The members of the Paramyxovirus (PMV) genus have neuraminidase, which is absent in the other genus.9 Virus replication takes place entirely in the cytoplasm in accordance with the scheme employed by negative-strand RNA viruses. Virus attaches to host cells through the “HN” polypeptide of the virus. Fusion of the virus and host cell membranes takes place (mediated by the “F” protein of the virus) and the nucleocapsid enters the host cell. The “F” and “HN” proteins require cleavage by host-derived enzymes and these procedures control pathogenicity in some strains.

Avian Paramyxovirus
Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the type strain for avian paramyxoviruses. Numerous, serologically different strains of this virus have been isolated world-wide. 81 Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests, neuraminidase inhibition tests, serum neutralization tests and comparison of structural polypeptides have resulted in the identification of nine serotypes (PMV-1 to PMV-9).4 Strains are designated according to serotype: species or type of birds from which virus was isolated/geographic location of isolation (usually country or state)/reference number or name/year of isolation.8 Table 32.14 lists the prototypes of various avian PMV serotypes. Avian PMV, particularly NDV, are important pathogens in domestic poultry and have prompted control measures that have had serious effects on international trade and movement of birds. Environmental and chemical stability, routes of transmission and pathogenesis of infections have been studied only with NDV. Comparisons with other serotypes are subjectively based.
PMV-1
PMV-1 consists of NDV and related strains that are serologically, molecular biologically and pathogenically unique. They are found in Columbiformes and some Psittaciformes. Strain-specific monoclonal antibodies are necessary to distinguish infection caused by these strains of PMV-1, which have been divided into nine distinct groups.8 Group P contains the pigeon isolates, which are no longer considered to be classic NDV.
Newcastle Disease
NDV is distributed worldwide with the possible exception of the various islands of Oceania. Birds from these islands should be considered immunologically naive with respect to NDV. NDV is serologically uniform and isolates are divided based on their virulence and epizootiologic importance (velogenic, mesogenic or lentogenic). These divisions are applicable only to the domestic chicken. Virulence is host-specific and varies considerably with experimental infections in other species.46 The host spectrum includes hundreds of species from at least 27 orders.195 Susceptibility and the clinical course of disease are highly variable between species and apparently depend on the epitopes and the enzymatic status of the host. Birds of all ages are susceptible to infection. Although overheating may be a triggering factor, no real seasonal peaks have been described. Table 32.15 shows the susceptibility of a variety of orders.91,148 Some mammals are susceptible to NDV, and humans may develop a severe conjunctivitis.
Transmission
Virus enters the host mainly through the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Embryos can be infected if their shells are contaminated with virus. Vertical transmission can occur, but is rare with velogenic strains because viremic hens usually stop laying. Lentogenic and apathogenic NDV might be egg transmitted via the vitelline membrane. This route of transmission is thought to occur regularly following vaccination with live lentogenic strains (Hitchner B1). Although virus can be found in respiratory secretions, the main route of viral shedding is the feces. Mechanical vectors that may spread the virus include wind, insects, equipment and humans. Immune birds can function as carriers and intermittently shed virus. Persistent infections are limited to weeks or months. The most common carriers (reservoirs) include free-ranging waterfowl, Pittidae, Psittaciformes, some Passeriformes and Strigiformes. 21,45,59,90,157,158,183, 249,269,296,354,366,394
Pathogenesis
NDV has an affinity for erythrocytes allowing the virus to be widely distributed throughout the host’s body. Dyspnea may be caused by lung congestion and damage to the respiratory center. Petechiation results from viral adherence and damage to the vascular endothelium. The highly variable virulence of a given strain in a particular host is governed by the amino acid sequences of the “F” and “HN” viral proteins and the type of proteases available in the host for cleavage of the protein precursors.13 The incubation period varies depending on the host species, previous virus exposure, pathotype of virus and titer of infecting virus.
Clinical Disease and Pathology
Lentogenic, mesogenic and velogenic strains of NDV produce varying clinical disease in chickens. The clinical expression varies widely in other birds, even between two species of the same genus. Several clinical presentations are characteristic, but may vary considerably in their severity. In short, these can be summarized as follows:
Peracute death; several hours of depression caused by viremia.
Acute gastrointestinal disease (VVND); voluminous greenish diarrhea accompanied by anorexia, lethargy and cyanosis.
Acute respiratory disease; upper respiratory exudates, rales and dyspnea.
Acute gastrointestinal and respiratory disease.
Chronic central nervous system (CNS) disease characterized by opisthotonos, torticollis, tremors and clonic-tonic paralysis of the limbs.
CNS signs generally occur with the development of humoral antibodies and may occur following an acute or subclinical infection. Virus may not be recovered once CNS signs develop. Partial immunity can alter the clinical progression of disease and pathologic lesions (Figure 32.23). Affected birds typically have petechia on serosal surfaces and fatty tissues and on the mucosa of the larynx, trachea and proventriculus. Egg follicle hemorrhage may also be noted in protracted cases. Hemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis, mainly within the jejunum, is common with virulent strains. Lymphatic tissue in association with the hemorrhagic lesions forms “boutons,” which are pathognomonic in Phasianiformes. Birds with CNS signs may have no gross lesions, or hyperemia of the brain may occur. The histopathologic lesions are as variable as the clinical signs. Table 32.16 provides a summary of gross and microscopic changes in a variety of birds. CNS lesions are generally characterized by a nonpurulent encephalitis with vascular and perivascular infiltrates of mononuclear cells. Increased numbers of glial cells and pseudoneuronophagia may occur. Histologic lesions rarely correlate with the severity of clinical signs.

Diagnosis
For the rule-out list, infectious and noninfectious causes of gastrointestinal or respiratory tract disease should be considered. One differentiating factor is that ND is not associated with sinusitis. CNS lesions are typical for ND in a variety of bird species. As a rule, the incubation time is prolonged in these cases, and histopathologic lesions may be difficult to document. Comparable clinical signs may be seen with chlamydiosis (meningitis), salmonellosis (encephalitis purulenta) encephalomalacia, lead toxicity and calcium deficiencies. Histopathologic differentiation is only possible following thorough examination of a variety of affected tissues.

Antemortem diagnosis of NDV can be performed by culturing virus from feces or respiratory discharge (swabs) from affected birds. The number of samples required for a diagnosis depends on the size of the flock, the clinical signs (CNS) and the quarantine situation.

Feces or respiratory swabs should be placed in appropriate transport media, and any sample for virus isolation or serology should be shipped on ice (4°C). Serology results (HI or AGP) generally require two days, while culture results may take from three to five days to several weeks. Postmortem samples for virus isolation should include trachea, lung, spleen, liver and brain shipped in transport media on ice. Fixed tissues from the brain and trachea can be used for histopathology. Cryofrozen sections of the nasal or tracheal mucosa may be processed for staining with fluorescent antibodies (nonspecific reactions can occur). Fluid from the aqueous humor can be collected for HA (detect virus) and HI (antibodies to virus) and can provide the most rapid diagnosis (hours to days), if sufficient antigen is present in the sample.
Direct Virus Demonstration: Virus isolation can be achieved using feces, cloacal swabs or discharge from the respiratory tract. Isolation of the virus is required for complete classification. The ability of NDV to adapt to a variety of host systems can make it difficult to demonstrate directly. The fact that latently infected birds have low virus titers and that vaccine strains (even mesogenic ones in imported or migratory birds) may be present, complicate the evaluation of virus isolations.
Isolates determined to be PMV-1 by HI should be sent to designated laboratories for further differentiation. Specific characterization can be accomplished with monoclonal Abs and by determining virulence for chickens (mean death time of chicken embryos, intracerebral pathogenicity index [Hansen Test], intravenous pathogenicity index, plaque formation test).
Indirect Virus Demonstration: The response to antigens by the production of humoral antibodies varies within taxonomic groups and individually. Therefore, indirect virus demonstration by humoral antibodies may be difficult. HI titers can be present by the fourth day post-infection and may vary considerably. Titers may be nonexistent or low (birds of prey, domesticated pigeons, budgerigars), even in birds that have survived the disease. The development of HI antibodies may be delayed, and latent infections can result in the formation of antibodies. The HI titers that develop in Psittaciformes may be low with Amazon parrots and Psittaculidae, having average titers of 1:8 to 1:64, while cockatoos may have titers of 1:320.
Treatment
Hyperimmune serum (2 ml/kg body weight IM) can be used to protect exposed birds but is of no benefit once clinical signs are present. CNS signs occur in the presence of humoral antibodies. Use of B vitamins and anticonvulsants for treating NDV-induced non-purulent encephalitis is discouraging; in controlled studies, there was no difference in treated or untreated groups. Following improvement (which may take a year), any disturbance or stressful event may cause a bird to have severe convulsions or tremors.111
Control
NDV occurs worldwide and many free-ranging birds can function as carriers. Effective vaccination regimes would be helpful in controlling infections in aviaries, breeding farms and zoo collections; however, ND is a notifiable disease in many countries and governmental regulations may control vaccination protocols. Most birds in orders other than Phasianiformes must be vaccinated parenterally for an effective antibody response to occur. Inactivated vaccines produced for chickens are useful, provided that there are no governmental regulations that restrict vaccination. Oil-adjuvanted vaccines have been shown to cause abscesses surrounding the injection site in some birds and must be used with caution. Abscesses secondary to subcutaneous infections are easier to treat than those that occur following IM injections.111

Live vaccines produced for chickens (and used for other Galliformes) should not be used in other avian orders. The potential infectivity of the vaccine strain of virus in a non-adapted host has not been determined. Vaccines administered to Psittaciformes in the drinking water have been shown to be ineffective.

As a general consideration in an active outbreak, emergency vaccination with Hitchner B1 and truly apathogenic LaSota strains is possible via ocular or nasal drops (five chicken doses per bird). These strains function as competitive inhibitors, and the local protection induced cannot be determined by an increase in humoral antibodies. In a recent outbreak on a farm with ornamental birds (more than 2000 birds of more than 200 species), this vaccination method successfully protected birds that were not yet clinically sick.65a

Dosing with live virus vaccine followed by a booster after three weeks provides three to four months of immunity. Inactivated vaccines provide five to seven months of immunity. A live vaccine followed two to three weeks later by an inactivated vaccine might provide 9 to 12 months of protection. These data are applicable only to gallinaceous birds. Increases in HI titers following vaccination are indicative of a host response and may not correlate with immunity.



Zoonotic Potential
Virulent poultry as well as vaccine strains of NDV can cause severe conjunctivitis in humans. Infected people usually recover with few problems.
PMV-1 Pigeon
A PMV-1 strain that is closely related to NDV but serologically, biochemically and pathogenically unique was first recognized in domesticated pigeons in the late 1970’s, probably having arisen in the Middle East.4,10,196 The virus reached Europe by 1981 and spread all over the world, affecting particularly racing and show pigeons.40,333 Monoclonal antibodies have shown PMV-1 pigeon strains recovered in many European countries to be fairly uniform. The host spectrum includes domesticated pigeons, feral doves and the Wood Pigeon. Sensitive (but more or less inadvertently infected) species include Cracidae, Pavoninae, Phasianinae, Common Blackbird, House Sparrow, Barn Swallow, European Kestrel, Common Buzzard, Vinaceous Amazon and Eastern Rosella.367 The virus is infectious to chickens, particularly immunocompromised individuals.333,414 Experimentally infected chickens do not become latent carriers.274 Some infections occur from ingestion of contaminated feces. Feed contaminated with pigeon or dove feces can be a source of infection for other avian species, particularly chickens.7
Clinical Disease and Pathology
Affected Columbiformes have nondescript clinical signs including polydipsia, polyuria, anorexia, diarrhea and vomiting. These frequently unrecognized acute signs are followed by clonic-tonic paralysis of the wings (more rarely the hind limbs), head tremors and torticollis. In contrast to ND, flaccid paresis and paralysis may occur, probably from a peripheral neuropathy.95 Other less frequent signs are unilateral blepharedema, egg deformation, embryo mortality and dystrophic molt. Dyspnea, which is common with ND, does not occur. Mortality is highest in nestlings. Affected older birds may spontaneously recover within three to four weeks after the onset of clinical signs. Gross lesions include hyperemia of the brain and large parenchymatous organs, catarrhal enteritis, swelling of the kidneys and hemorrhage and necrosis of the pancreas.


Histologic lesions are variable. Edema of the meninges and brain and swelling of the vascular endothelium in the meningeal vessels may be noted. Lymphocytic perivascular infiltrates and demyelination of the white matter may occur in the cerebrum, diencephalon, optic lobe, medulla oblongata, intumescentia cervicalis and lumbaris of the spinal cord. Degenerative and inflammatory lesions also occur in the peripheral nerves (plexus brachialis, plexus ischiadicus). 95 Lysis of Purkinje cells in the cerebrum, which was reported initially with PMV-1 pigeon, may have been caused by herpesvirus that was also isolated from affected birds.277
Diagnosis
Procedures designed for isolating NDV are effective for PMV-1 pigeon. The HI test can be used to differentiate between NDV and PMV-1 pigeon. Final differentiation is possible only by the use of monoclonal antibodies.
Treatment
LaSota vaccine strains administered via eye or nasal drop are not as efficacious in protecting from infections as expected. The LaSota strains replicate poorly in pigeon tissue so that high vaccine doses are necessary for interference and antibody production (protection only for 8 to 12 weeks).170 Vaccination with live vaccines may exacerbate latent chlamydia or pigeon herpesvirus infections.222 Parenteral administration of live Hitchner B1 vaccine has similar side effects but may provide six months of immunity.

Inactivated vaccines are preferable for pigeons. In an active outbreak, vaccination with an inactivated vaccine will decrease the length of the disease and mitigate the clinical signs.170 Once CNS signs develop, vaccination is of no value; however, spontaneous recoveries do occur.
Control
For vaccination, homologous, inactivated oil emulsion vaccines are commercially available.220 Annual boosters are necessary.220 All birds in a loft, and competitive traveling groups of homing pigeons, should be vaccinated. Squabs from hens vaccinated three months before laying may not have protective antibodies. 220 Squabs can be vaccinated with homologous vaccine by four weeks of age.222 Inactivated NDV vaccines provide only six months of protection.166

Vaccines are best applied subcutaneously in the neck. Intramuscular injections in homing pigeons can cause severe irritation of the pectoral muscles. To prevent fatal hemorrhage from the plexus subcutaneous collaris (see Chapter 44), injections must be given in the caudal third of the neck, near the middle of the dorsal aspect. Oil-emulsion adjuvants produce superior antibody titers and have fewer side effects than aqueous carbomers.48,319 An effective oral vaccine has not been developed and requires the isolation of an apathogenic PMV-1 pigeon strain.

PMV-2
PMV-2 strains that occur worldwide display considerable antigenic and structural diversity.9 Preliminary classification using monoclonal antibodies has identified four groups.300 Isolates from Psittaciformes, some Passeriformes, one Gadwall as well as several turkey isolates from Israel together with a Mallard and a Coot strain belong to group 1. Group 2 consists of chicken strains from the Arabic Peninsula, and two strains from Passeriformes have been assigned to group 3. In group 4, a variety of strains from Passeriformes has been placed. The type strain PMV-2/Chicken/California/Yucaipa/56 belongs to group 1. The host spectrum includes chickens, turkeys, Passeriformes, Psittaciformes and more rarely, rails and ducks.

PMV-2 strains are endemic in Passeriformes (Ploceidae, Zonotrichiinae, Zosteropidae and Estrildidae), particularly those originating from Senegal. Isolates have been recovered from clinically healthy imported companion and aviary birds (Estrildidae, Viduidae, Ploceidae and Carduelidae). Experimentally, these isolates cause a mild upper respiratory tract disease. PMV-2 infections are more severe in Psittaciformes, particularly in African Grey Parrots, where emaciation, weakness, pneumonia, mucoid tracheitis and mortality are common findings.64 The Bangor isolate from finches was proposed as a cause of death in a Blue Waxbill. Experimentally the Bangor isolate caused only mild respiratory signs and no pathologic lesions.263 Further investigations in a variety of bird species are necessary in order to evaluate the virulence of the various strains.

The host spectrum may be much wider than has been shown by direct virus demonstration. Antibodies against PMV-2 have been demonstrated in homing pigeons, healthy Passeriformes (many of them free-ranging) and some birds of prey. Isolates from various finches have not been shown to be pathogenic for chicks.116,204 Diagnostic methods used for PMV-1 are also applicable to PMV-2.

PMV-3
PMV-3 strains have been isolated from chickens and turkeys in North America, Great Britain, France and Germany. Most isolates from nondomesticated species originated from imported Psittaciformes (lovebirds, cockatiels, budgerigars, macaws, Psittacula spp, Neophema spp.). Some Passeriformes are also susceptible. Antibodies to PMV-3 have not been documented in feral birds, but a free-ranging avian reservoir probably exists.

Two groups of PMV-3 strains, one consisting mainly of turkey strains and the other of strains isolated from companion birds, can be differentiated using monoclonal antibodies.19 The virus is serologically related to NDV. PMV-3/Parakeet/Netherlands/ 449/75 will protect chickens against NDV.8 Intracerebral pathogenicity indices vary from 0.25 to 0.35 358 up to 1.3. 385
Clinical Disease and Pathology
The pathogenicity of this virus group varies with the infected species and (probably) virus strain. Conjunctivitis is the initial clinical sign in finches and Weaver Finches (eg, Gouldian Finch, Red-cheeked Blue Waxbill, Canary, White-rumped Canary, Orange- cheeked Waxbill, Black-throated Grassfinch, Double-barred Finch and Avadavat). Yellowish diarrhea, dyspnea and dysphagia occur as the disease progresses. Some affected birds die within a few days, while others recover over a period of weeks.358 CNS signs are not regularly seen in finches (Black-eared Wheater, Grey-headed Wheater, Red-breasted Flycatcher).367 Infected Psittaciformes develop CNS signs similar to those with ND. Susceptibility in Psittaciformes is variable. African Grey Parrots may develop ocular lesions (dilated pupils, hemorrhages around the pecten, uveitis and fibrinous exudate into the anterior chamber), unilateral or bilateral paralyses and hemorrhagic nasal discharge.148

Latent carriers have been described in Siberian Rubythroat, Long-tailed Grass Finch, Nutmeg-Mannikin and Cutthroat Finch; Japanese Quail and domesticated pigeon.358,367,385

Detailed pathologic descriptions are not available. Liver and kidney lesions accompanied by an enteritis with blood in the intestinal lumen are common. Small birds are frequently cachectic, suggesting a chronic disease course or the inability to eat and drink. Histopathologically, hyperemia and a mild proliferation of glial cells in the brain may be seen. The typical nonpurulent encephalitis described with the CNS form of ND is not recognized with PMV-3 infections.
Diagnosis and Control
Salmonella spp., NDV, chlamydia and mycotoxins should be considered in the list of differential diagnoses. The methods for demonstration of the virus are the same as with other PMV groups. Serologically, there are cross reactions with PMV-1. An exact differentiation is possible with monoclonal antibodies. An oil emulsion vaccine was developed in Great Britain to counteract the decrease of egg production in affected turkeys. Another inactivated vaccine produced sufficient immunity in budgerigars and canaries to withstand challenge.35

PMV-5
Budgerigars are considered the host of PMV-5. The type strain is called Kunitachi virus 289 and has been since lost. Possibly related strains have been isolated from free-ranging Rainbow Lories and budgerigars from the same area of Australia.284,285

Natural and experimental infections in budgerigars are characterized by acute diarrhea, dyspnea, torticollis and death. Affected budgerigars in Australia had severe diarrhea with a 50% mortality rate. Affected Rainbow Lories became depressed, lethargic and had three to four days of diarrhea followed by death. Birds were typically anorexic but drank liberally.

Necropsy findings in budgerigars were limited to hyperemia of the parenchymatous organs. Rainbow Lories had swollen livers and spleens and necrotizing- to-ulcerative or diphtheroid-to-hemorrhagic enteritis, with hemorrhages within the mucosa of the ventriculus and proventriculus as well as edema of the intestinal wall.

Histopathologic lesions included multiple necrotic foci in the liver and kidney with the development of giant cells. In Rainbow Lories, extensive loss of the intestinal epithelium with desquamated necrotic material and erythrocytes in the lumen was common. Mild perivascular infiltration with lymphocytes was common in edematous intestinal walls. The differential diagnosis list should include Salmonella spp., NDV, E. coli and nutritional deficiencies. PMV-5 cannot be isolated via all the same methods as other PMV strains.

PMV-7
PMV-7 has been isolated only from Columbiformes. The type strain was isolated from doves in Tennessee, and another isolate from the Rock Pigeon in Japan. All strains have a heat-stable hemagglutinin, and are considered apathogenic. Whether or not the Japanese and the New World strains are the same has not been determined.6
PMV-4, PMV-6, PMV-8 and PMV-9
These groups contain virus strains recovered from clinically healthy waterfowl located in the United States and Asia. PMV-4 is rather uniform and is apathogenic in chickens.5 The duck strains of PMV-6 may cause a mild respiratory disease and decreased egg production in turkeys.13 Isolates have been recovered by culture of tracheal and cloacal swabs.377 Details on PMV-8 and PMV-9 are limited. Carriers of PMV-4 and PMV-6 include Canada Goose, Common Teal, Common Pintail, Mallard, American Black Duck, Ring-necked Duck and Hooded Merganser.148 Parainfluenza-2-virus (PI-2-virus) The PI-2-virus, which belongs to the genus PMV, does not cause clinical disease or decrease in egg production in chickens. The virus can, however, be egg transmitted without influencing the embryonal development. The chicken PI-2-virus is identical to the agent that causes croupous pneumonia in humans. The PI-2-virus is important because it is not easily recognizable as a source of human infections and may be a contaminant in embryonated chicken eggs used for vaccine production.203,421,422

Los datos que ofrece la OIE de la Enfermedad de Newcasle son los siguientes:

ETIOLOGÍA
Clasificación del agente causal
Virus de la familia Paramyxoviridae, género Rubulavirus
Temperatura:
Inactivado a 56°C/3 horas, 60°C/30 min
pH:
Inactivado a pH ácido
Productos químicos:
Sensible al éter
Desinfectantes:
Inactivado por formalina y fenol
Supervivencia:
Sobrevive durante largos períodos a temperatura ambiente, especialmente en las heces

EPIDEMIOLOGÍA
Huéspedes
Muchas especies de aves tanto domésticas como salvajes
Los índices de mortalidad y de morbilidad varían según las especies y en función de la cepa viral
Las gallinas son las aves de corral más susceptibles, los patos y los gansos son las menos susceptibles
Puede existir un estado portador en las psitacinas y en algunas otras aves salvajes
Transmisión
Contacto directo con las secreciones de las aves infectadas, especialmente las heces
Comida , agua, instrumentos, locales, vestimentas humanas, etc., contaminados
Fuentes de virus
Secreciones respiratorias, heces
Todas las partes de las aves muertas
El virus es transmitido durante el período de incubación y por un período limitado durante la convalecencia.
Se ha demostrado que algunos psitácidos transmiten durante más de un año el virus de la enfermedad de Newcastle de manera intermitente
Distribución geográfica
La enfermedad de Newcastle es endémica en muchos países del mundo. Durante años algunos países europeos no han tenido esta enfermedad
Para más detalle sobre la distribución geográfica, véanse los últimos números de Sanidad Animal Mundial y el Boletín de la OIE
DIAGNÓSTICO
El período de incubación de 4-6 días
Diagnóstico clínico
Síntomas respiratorios y/o nerviosos:
jadeo y tos
alas caídas, arrastran las patas, cabeza y cuellos torcidos, desplazamientos en círculos, depresión, inapetencia, parálisis completa.
Interrupción parcial o completa de la producción de huevos.
Huevos deformados, de cáscara rugosa y fina y que contienen albúmina acuosa
Diarrea verde acuosa
Tejidos hinchados en torno a los ojos y el cuello
La morbilidad y mortalidad dependen de la virulencia de la cepa del virus, del grado de inmunidad a la vacunación, de las condiciones ambientales y del estado de las aves de la explotación.
Lesiones
La enfermedad de Newcastle no produce lesiones patognómicas macroscópicas
Varias aves deben ser examinadas para realizar un diagnóstico tentativo.
Para el diagnóstico final se debe esperar el aislamiento del virus y su identificación
Las lesiones que se pueden encontrar son:
edema del tejido intersticial o peritraqueal del cuello, especialmente cerca de la entrada torácica
congestión y algunas veces hemorragias en la mucosa traqueal
petequia y pequeñas equimosis en la mucosa del proventrículo, concentradas alrededor de los orificios de las glándulas mucosas
edema, hemorragias, necrosis o ulceraciones del tejido linfoide en la mucosa de la pared intestinal
edema, hemorragias o degeneración de los ovarios
Diagnóstico diferencial
Cólera aviar
Influenza aviar
Laringotraqueítis
Viruela aviar (forma diftérica)
Psitacosis (clamidiosis) (Aves psitácidas )
Micoplasmosis
Bronquitis infecciosa
Enfermedad de Pacheco del papagayo (Aves psitácidas)
También errores de manejo, tales como falta de agua, aire, alimentación
Diagnóstico de laboratorio
Procedimientos
Identificación del agente
Inoculación de los huevos de gallina de 9-11 días de embrionados y a continuación:
examen de la actividad de hemaglutinación,
inhibición de la hemaglutinación mediante un antisuero específico a la enfermedad de Newcastle.
Evaluación de la patogenicidad
Prueba de las placas en cultivos de fibroblastos de embriones
Tiempo medio de mortalidad medio de los huevos de gallina que están embrionando
Indice de patogenicidad intracerebral en pollitos de 1 día
Indice de patogenicidad intravenoso en pollos de 6 semanas
Pruebas serológicas
Prueba de inhibición de la hemaglutinación
ELISA
Muestras
Identificación del agente
Torundas de tráquea y cloaca (o muestras de heces) de aves vivas o de grupos de órganos y heces de aves muertas
Pruebas serológicas
Muestras de sangre coagulada o suero
PREVENCIÓN Y PROFILAXIS
No hay tratamiento
Profilaxis sanitaria
Aislamiento estricto de los focos
Destrucción de todas las aves infectadas y expuestas a la infección
Limpieza y la desinfección a fondo de los locales
Destrucción adecuada de las aves muertas
Control de plagas en las explotaciones
Respetar un plazo de 21 días antes de la repoblación
Evitar el contacto con aves cuya situación sanitaria se desconoce
Control de desplazamientos humanos
Se recomienda la cría de un grupo de edad por granja
Profilaxis médica
La vacunación a partir de vacunas con virus vivo y/o en emulsión oleosa puede reducir sensiblemente las pérdidas en las explotaciones avícolas
Se administran cepas activas B1 y La Sota en agua potable o por aspersión. Algunas veces son administradas por vía intranasal o intraocular. Los pollitos en buen estado pueden ser vacunados desde el 1-4 día de vida, pero la eficacia de la vacunación aumenta si se espera hasta la segunda o tercera semana
Algunas otras infecciones (por ejemplo, Micoplasma) pueden agravar la reacción a la vacuna. En ese caso se debe usar vacunas con virus inactivados.

CAPÍTULO 2.1.15. del Código Terrestre de la OIE

ENFERMEDAD DE NEWCASTLE

Artículo 2.1.15.1.
A efectos del Código Terrestre, el período de incubación de la enfermedad de Newcastle es de 21 días.

Las normas para las pruebas de diagnóstico y las vacunas están descritas en el Manual Terrestre.

Artículo 2.1.15.2.
País libre de enfermedad de Newcastle

Se puede considerar que un país está libre de enfermedad de Newcastle cuando consta que la enfermedad no se ha presentado en el mismo desde hace por lo menos 3 años.

Este plazo se reducirá a 6 meses después de haberse sacrificado al último animal afectado para los países que apliquen el sacrificio sanitario, asociado o no a la vacunación contra la enfermedad de Newcastle.

Artículo 2.1.15.3.
Zona infectada de enfermedad de Newcastle

Se considerará que una zona está infectada de enfermedad de Newcastle hasta que hayan transcurrido:

1. 21 días, por lo menos, desde la confirmación del último caso y la conclusión de las operaciones de sacrificio sanitario y desinfección, o

2. 6 meses desde el restablecimiento clínico o la muerte del último animal afectado si no se ha aplicado el sacrificio sanitario.

Artículo 2.1.15.4.
Las Administraciones Veterinarias de los países libres de la enfermedad de Newcastle podrán prohibir la importación o el tránsito por su territorio, procedentes de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, de las mercancías siguientes:

1. aves domésticas y silvestres;

2. aves de un día;

3. huevos para incubar;

4. semen de aves domésticas y silvestres;

5. carnes frescas de aves domésticas y silvestres;

6. productos cárnicos de aves domésticas y silvestres que no hayan sido sometidos a un tratamiento que garantiza la destrucción del virus de la enfermedad de Newcastle;

7. productos de origen animal (de aves) destinados a la alimentación animal o al uso agrícola o industrial.

Artículo 2.1.15.5.
Cuando la importación proceda de países libres de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las aves domésticas

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que las aves:

1. no presentaron ningún signo clínico de enfermedad de Newcastle el día del embarque;

2. permanecieron en un país libre de enfermedad de Newcastle desde su nacimiento o durante, por lo menos, los 21 últimos días;

3. no fueron vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle, o

4. fueron vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle con una vacuna que cumple con las normas descritas en el Manual Terrestre (se indicará en el certificado la fecha de la vacunación, así como la naturaleza de la vacuna empleada).

Artículo 2.1.15.6.
Cuando la importación proceda de países libres de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las aves silvestres

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que las aves:

1. no presentaron ningún signo clínico de enfermedad de Newcastle el día del embarque;

2. proceden de un país libre de enfermedad de Newcastle;

3. permanecieron en una estación de cuarentena desde su nacimiento o durante, por lo menos, los 21 días anteriores al embarque.

Artículo 2.1.15.7.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las aves domésticas

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que las aves:

1. no presentaron ningún signo clínico de enfermedad de Newcastle el día del embarque;

2. proceden de una explotación inspeccionada periódicamente por la Autoridad Veterinaria;

3. proceden de una explotación que está libre de enfermedad de Newcastle y que no está situada en una zona infectada de enfermedad de Newcastle, o

4. permanecieron en una estación de cuarentena desde su nacimiento o durante los 21 días anteriores al embarque y resultaron negativas a una prueba de diagnóstico para la detección de la enfermedad de Newcastle;

5. no fueron vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle, o

6. fueron vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle con una vacuna que cumple con las normas descritas en el Manual Terrestre (se indicará en el certificado la fecha de la vacunación, así como la naturaleza de la vacuna empleada).

Artículo 2.1.15.8.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las aves silvestres

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que las aves:

1. no presentaron ningún signo clínico de enfermedad de Newcastle el día del embarque;

2. permanecieron en una estación de cuarentena desde su nacimiento o durante, por lo menos, los 21 días anteriores al embarque;

3. resultaron negativas a una prueba de diagnóstico para la detección de la enfermedad de Newcastle efectuada antes de la cuarentena.

Artículo 2.1.15.9.
Cuando la importación proceda de países libres de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las aves de un día

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que:

1. las aves de un día proceden de establecimientos de incubación situados en un país libre de enfermedad de Newcastle;

2. ni las aves de un día ni sus padres fueron vacunados con una vacuna a base de virus vivo modificado.

Artículo 2.1.15.10.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las aves de un día

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que las aves de un día:

1. proceden de establecimientos de incubación inspeccionados periódicamente por la Autoridad Veterinaria;

2. proceden de establecimientos de incubación que están libres de enfermedad de Newcastle y que no están situados en una zona infectada de enfermedad de Newcastle;

3. no fueron vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle, o

4. fueron vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle con una vacuna que cumple con las normas descritas en el Manual Terrestre (se indicará en el certificado la fecha de vacunación, así como la naturaleza de la vacuna empleada).

Artículo 2.1.15.11.
Cuando la importación proceda de países libres de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para los huevos para incubar

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que los huevos para incubar proceden de explotaciones o establecimientos de incubación situados en un país libre de enfermedad de Newcastle e inspeccionados periódicamente por las Autoridades Veterinarias.

Artículo 2.1.15.12.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para los huevos para incubar

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que los huevos para incubar:

1. fueron desinfectados según los procedimientos descritos en el Anexo 3.4.1.;

2. proceden de explotaciones o establecimientos de incubación inspeccionados periódicamente por la Autoridad Veterinaria;

3. proceden de explotaciones o establecimientos de incubación que están libres de enfermedad de Newcastle y que no están situados en una zona infectada de enfermedad de Newcastle;

4. proceden de explotaciones o establecimientos de incubación donde las aves no fueron vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle, o

5. proceden de explotaciones o establecimientos de incubación donde las aves fueron vacunadas contra la enfermedad de Newcastle (se indicará en el certificado la fecha de la vacunación, así como la naturaleza de la vacuna empleada).

Artículo 2.1.15.13.
Cuando la importación proceda de países libres de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para el semen de aves domésticas y silvestres

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que los reproductores donantes:

1. no presentaron ningún signo clínico de enfermedad de Newcastle el día de la toma del semen;

2. permanecieron en un país libre de enfermedad de Newcastle durante, por lo menos, los 21 días anteriores a la toma del semen.

Artículo 2.1.15.14.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para el semen de aves domésticas y silvestres

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que los reproductores donantes:

1. no presentaron ningún signo clínico de enfermedad de Newcastle el día de la toma del semen;

2. no fueron vacunados con una vacuna a base de virus vivo de la enfermedad de Newcastle en ningún momento previo a la toma del semen;

3. permanecieron en el país exportador, en una explotación inspeccionada periódicamente por las Autoridades Veterinarias;

4. permanecieron en una explotación que está libre de enfermedad de Newcastle y que no está situada en una zona infectada de enfermedad de Newcastle.

Artículo 2.1.15.15.
Cuando la importación proceda de países libres de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las carnes frescas de aves

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que toda la remesa de carnes procede de aves:

1. que permanecieron en un país libre de enfermedad de Newcastle desde su nacimiento o durante, por lo menos, los 21 últimos días;

2. que fueron sacrificadas en un matadero autorizado y presentaron resultados favorables en una inspección ante mortem y post mortem para la detección de la enfermedad de Newcastle.

Artículo 2.1.15.16.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las carnes frescas de aves

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que toda la remesa de carnes procede de aves:

1. que permanecieron en una explotación que está libre de enfermedad de Newcastle y que no está situada en una zona infectada de enfermedad de Newcastle;

2. que fueron sacrificadas en un matadero autorizado que no está situado en una zona infectada de enfermedad de Newcastle y presentaron resultados favorables en una inspección ante mortem y post mortem para la detección de la enfermedad de Newcastle.

Artículo 2.1.15.17.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para los productos cárnicos de aves

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que:

1. toda la remesa de productos cárnicos procede de aves que fueron sacrificadas en un matadero autorizado y presentaron resultados favorables en una inspección ante mortem y post mortem para la detección de la enfermedad de Newcastle;

2. los productos cárnicos fueron sometidos a un tratamiento que garantiza la destrucción del virus de la enfermedad de Newcastle;

3. se tomaron las precauciones necesarias después del tratamiento para evitar el contacto de las carnes con cualquier fuente de virus de enfermedad de Newcastle.

Artículo 2.1.15.18.
Cuando la importación proceda de países libres de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para los productos de origen animal (de aves) destinados a la alimentación animal o al uso agrícola o industrial

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que los productos proceden de aves que permanecieron en un país libre de enfermedad de Newcastle desde su nacimiento o durante, por lo menos, los 21 últimos días.

Artículo 2.1.15.19.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las harinas de carne y harinas de plumas (de aves)

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que los productos fueron sometidos a un tratamiento térmico que garantiza la destrucción del virus de la enfermedad de Newcastle.

Artículo 2.1.15.20.
Cuando la importación proceda de países considerados infectados de enfermedad de Newcastle, las Administraciones Veterinarias deberán exigir:

para las plumas y los plumones (de aves)

la presentación de un certificado veterinario internacional en el que conste que los productos fueron sometidos a un tratamiento que garantiza la destrucción del virus de la enfermedad de Newcastle.

Ultimos informes de la OIE sobre la Enfermedad de Newcastle
Albania : 26 de marzo de 2004
Argelia : 14 de febrero de 2003
Australia : 27 de junio de 2003
Austria : 14 de noviembre de 2003
Bahrain : 30 de enero de 2004
Belarrús : 13 de junio de 2003
Botsuana : 3 de enero de 2003
Canadá : 19 de septiembre de 2003
Dinamarca : 7 de marzo de 2003
Estados Unidos de América : 21 de noviembre de 2003
Italia : 6 de febrero de 2004
Kuwait : 31 de enero de 2003
Namibia : 14 de marzo de 2003
Níger : 14 de marzo de 2003
Noruega : 7 de noviembre de 2003
Rusia : 8 de agosto de 2003
Serbia y Montenegro : 14 de marzo de 2003
Sudán : 18 de abril de 2003
Suecia : 28 de mayo de 2004
Taipei China : 23 de mayo de 2003




Por Juan M. Griñán. Veterinario JG especialista en medicina aviar

El texto aquí expresado corresponde a una revisión bibliográfica, a comunicaciones personales de mi actividad clínica y a parte de mi ponencia en el II Congreso JG de julio del 2004 celebrado en el Hospital Veterinario JG de Mutxamel (Alicante-Spain)

Para cualquier comentario o sugerencia no dude en enviarme un e-mail

Copyright 2013, Hospital Veterinario JG Mutxamel - Alicante - España